Up Close and Personal Mailshots

In an earlier blog, we delved into the world of mailshots and the value of creating unmissable mail moments for your clients and potential customers – which is exactly what we’re so good at, here at Mailing Expert, without wishing to blow our own trumpet too loudly. (But doing it anyway!)

For your mail shot to be noticed and read – well, that’s what you want, isn’t it? – there are certain measures you have to take. How else will your DM campaign be an effective means of promoting your product or services – and cost-effective too? We’re here to help you get your messages noticed and your deals considered.

Looking good?

When you’re designing your mailshot, whether it’s a letter, postcard or flyer, think about who it is that you want to engage and design it accordingly. It’s important to know your audience. Are they young mothers? Silver surfers? Professionals? City dwellers? Undertake some research into the sort of aesthetics that will appeal. That might sound like stereotyping but, in reality, it makes marketing sense. If it’s relevant to whoever you’re targeting then they’re more likely to read it.

If you don’t feel confident enough to create something in-house then you could make use of our professional design and printing services.

The personal touch

Are you more likely to read something that’s addressed to you by name or something generic? There’s really only one answer to that question and at Mailing Expert we have the means to personalise each item you send out with the customer’s name. Be careful, though, to make sure whatever you send is genuinely relevant to that person and sent at an appropriate time. It will backfire badly and make your company look sloppy if it’s a poorly targeted mailshot.

Words matter

Be brief. It’s strange to say, maybe, but thinking up a few choice words and a snappy headline actually takes a lot longer than writing great chunks of text. It’s worth the time taken – every minute of it. Directness, a dynamic central message and clear instructions about how to proceed if someone is interested are crucial. People are always busy these days. If a piece of writing takes too long to process, guess what?…it will be discarded.

Be warm and engaging. It’s a great way to start building a relationship with someone, or consolidate an existing relationship. Think about humour and edginess, if that fits in with the personality of your brand.

Tried and Tested

Don’t just get your mailshot printed and sent off without testing it out on colleagues or people you know from the relevant demographic. Far better to tinker a bit with design and wording before it’s too late. Above all, proofread and proofread again. There’s nothing more calculated to give the wrong impression about your company and the significance it places on attention to detail than a mailshot which has spelling mistakes, words missed out and apostrophes where apostrophes shouldn’t be.

Value for money

Follow all these suggestions and your mailshot will reap rewards for your company, tempting new customers and impressing others. Your name and brand will be out there and remembered for all the right reasons for a long time to come.

Contact us on 01825 983033 if you’d like our help.

Mailing Expert

The wonderful world of variable data

“Variety’s the very spice of life, that gives it all its flavour.”

There’s that quote that we know so well, in its entirety – and a congratulatory pat on the back for anyone who knows who it’s by (without looking it up on Google!)[1] With any direct mailing you undertake, variable data can really increase the effectiveness of your campaign – add flavour to it, you could say.  Let Mailing Expert tell you how.

So what is variable data?

No, variable data is NOT the same as alternative facts, a phrase which is all too current at the moment.  In this context, we are talking about variable data printing, commonly abbreviated to VDP.   VDP makes use of digital technology to link print engines to databases which contain content for printed documents. It makes changes to pieces of print automatically – with no manual steps – as they are being printed, allowing you to personalise your communication with ease by varying text details, images, colour schemes, charts…you name it, if it can be printed, you can change it. It’s a technique that is closely related to mail merge, but VDP allows changes to text, graphics and layout.

Why use VDP?

Well, do you want more sales, higher returns and an exponential rise in customer loyalty? Would you like better targeted communications filled with relevant information? There are many marketing studies which show categorically that personalising communications really can boost their effectiveness.

By ‘personalising communications’ we don’t just mean putting ‘Dear Katie’ at the top instead of ‘Dear Valued Customer’.  In a 2014 survey,[2] it was revealed that 63% of people receive so many name-personalised messages that it has ceased to have any impact. Your intended audience needs something more and better now – like VDP.

How can VDP help?

Imagine you were launching a new range of clothing for children.  With VDP, each DM flyer you send out can be customised to appeal directly to the intended recipient.  It goes without saying that names and addresses will be different for each one (as in mail merge).  The brilliant thing about VDP is that with a diligently-populated database which has captured the ages, sex and ethnicity of children, in just one print run, you could produce flyers that target parents of 10 year-old girls…or baby boys…or families with Chinese heritage…or any other attribute you have researched and stored.  Of course, this all relies on the content of the database… In the example we’re using, you’ll need a whole portfolio of images showing all sorts of children wearing your clothes range.

What about populating databases?

That’s the tedious bit, isn’t it? If you’re using variable data, then it must be stored in the database in the first place.  In most cases, this has to be inserted manually, though some computer programs can gather bulk information from different sources and transfer it directly.  Your data can come from many areas of customer contact – from call centre enquiries, your website and from sales activity.  Nevertheless, at each point, someone has to put in the information and all the colour choices, fonts and images to appeal to different demographics.  And once done, of course, it has to be kept up to date.  There’s nothing worse for your company image than sending a DM with incorrect or irrelevant information.

So is it all worth it in the end?

Here at Mailing Expert, we would say a resounding YES! More statistics, if you’re not convinced:

  • 74% of marketers report that personalisation increases customer engagement leading to improving conversions[3]
  • 84% report better customer loyalty and retention[4]

SO…start filling in that database – or better still, give us a call and we’ll tell you how we can help you.

 

Mailing Expert

 

[1] William Cowper. From his 1785 poem, ‘The Task’

[2] Conducted by digital messaging platform, Lyris

[3] Econsultancy research

[4] ExactTarget

The font of all knowledge? Part 1

We all know that writing compelling content is crucial for marketing material but it’s easy to underestimate the importance of using the right font – a word now interchangeable with typeface  – for your website, flyers, posters or other paper collateral.

A font speaks volumes

Whatever you choose has an impact. It can make your business stand out from the competition.  When it’s too fancy or too small to read easily, it can annoy potential customers so much that you’ve lost them forever. It can convey your brand or the tone of the message you wish to get across or it can confuse because it’s inappropriate to the content.

For instance:

You’re advertising pre-paid funerals. Tell you what, let’s not use Curlz MT …

Curlz MT Font

Perhaps just a tad too jolly and informal?

In recent years, there’s been a lot of interest in what is actually a very complex subject. In 2001, Dr. Aric Sigman was commissioned to research into the psychology of fonts. Ten years later, Simon Garfield published a book called Just My Type.  These studies offer a fascinating insight into some of the different aspects of your font choice.

Yes, fonts are people too

First, each font has its own personality and in choosing one over another it says a lot about us at the same time. The infamous Comic Sans, for example, is meant to be perfect for ‘annoying attention-seekers,’ while Times gives a trustworthy and respectable impression. You’re advised not to use Courier unless you want to appear to be a real nerd. Oh and by the way, this is written in Calibri, which apparently has ‘a warm and soft character.’ Well, thank you kindly, but less of the soft, please.

The names of famous people are even attributed to fonts in the study, so for example, Richard Branson is Verdana (professional yet appealing) and Jennifer Lopez is Shelley (sex kitten).

Shelly Script Regular Font

It’s all very subjective, isn’t it? To us, Shelley doesn’t so much say ‘sex kitten’ as ‘Victorian school child’ – which brings us on to the next point.

Font preferences for readers

Apparently, different fonts appeal to different demographics and provoke various reactions, so when creating a web page or paper document of any sort, we should consider gender, age, culture and even personality to be more effective in reaching and captivating our chosen audience.

These considerations  all seems to become a bit simplistic and stereotypical, with blocky, bold, rectilinear fonts supposedly appealing to men, and curvy, round fonts allegedly preferred by women. Then, let’s use something funky for young people and LARGE AND CLEAR for an older age group.

In reality, we suspect, the most all of us want is something that’s easy to read!

Part 2 in this series, to follow shortly, is about fancy fonts.

 

Mailing Expert